Master of Science in Legal Technology

Gain practical insights as well as theoretical knowledge in specialised areas of law with a Master of Science in Legal Technology at LSBF Singapore. The postgraduate programme is awarded by the University of Law in the UK, ranked 1st for overall student satisfaction in England.

Master of Science in Legal Technology

Key Facts

  • Duration: 11 months (full-time), 23 months (part-time)
  • Intake date: January and September
  • Delivery Mode:
    • Live Online
    • On campus 
  • Fees: SGD $21,000 (Local & International students)

The University of Law is one of the UK's longest-established specialist providers of legal education. It traces its origins to 1876 with the formation of the tutorial firm Gibson & Weldon. With a rich heritage and a reputation for innovation and contemporary teaching practices, we continuously focus on developing the best legal and business minds.
The university’s track record of excellence in learning and development has helped them establish worldwide connections within the legal and business industries. This is why many leading global law firms and businesses work exclusively with them to develop their people, and why employers of all types want to meet their students. It’s why law schools and professional bodies around the world choose to enter into strategic alliances with them.
They are now at the heart of education as an acknowledged leader in innovative, professional legal and business teaching for prospective lawyers and business professionals, both in the UK and worldwide. With a rich heritage and a reputation for leading contemporary teaching practices, they continuously focus on developing the best legal minds and business leaders. They have been ranked first amongst universities for overall student satisfaction in England in the 2020 National Student Survey.
LSBF Singapore is excited to offer master's programmes in partnership with the University of Law in 2021.

The University of Law is one of the longest-established specialist providers of legal education and training in the UK, also offering Business, Criminology and Policing courses.

The Law School MSc Legal Technology programme is designed under the University’s Category 2 Master’s Framework.

All Law School Master’s (and PG Dip and Cert) programmes will enable students to gain practical insights as well as theoretical knowledge in specialised areas of law. All modules approved for study under the Law School’s Master’s (and PG Dip and Cert) programmes will develop students’ transferable skills through the University’s embedded employability strategy. Upon completion of one of the Master’s Awards programmes, students will be able to successfully tackle complex legal issues arising from practical scenarios, provide competent legal advice to fictional clients and critically evaluate the principles of law covered by the programme.

The University recognises that a number of students attracted to the MSc and PG Dip and Cert Legal Technology will either be from non-common law jurisdictions or from a non-law background. Therefore, a comprehensive induction programme will form part of the first two weeks of study, covering the key principles of the common law system. This will be made available to all students enrolled on the programmes. The full induction programme will be available both face to face and online.

In particular, the aims are as follows:

  • To develop a systematic understanding of the law and practice on the part of learners, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, at the forefront of the areas, studied.
  • To enhance learners’ intellectual, transferable and interpersonal skills as well as developing postgraduate skills such as the demonstration of initiative and autonomy in planning and implementing tasks at a professional level.
  • To develop further a comprehensive understanding of legal research techniques and methodology and their application.
  • To provide learners with a programme of study that enhances their prospects of legally related professional, commercial, business, or academic employment.
  • To provide flexibility in delivery modes to increase learner access to the LLM, and particularly for international learners or those already employed in legal practice.
  • To cater for a range of learning preferences through a variety of learner-centred activities and using a variety of learning media.

The programme provides opportunities for students to achieve the following learning outcomes:

A. Knowledge and understanding

Upon successful completion of the programme, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

A1. a substantial range of practical and theoretical legal and technological principles and processes relevant to the areas studied.

A2. the law of England and Wales and, where appropriate, European and or international law.

A3. current research and practical scholarship in relation to specific areas of law and technology both domestically and internationally, as appropriate.

A4. current problems and insights at the forefront of the discipline.

A5. research methods appropriate to law and the social sciences, including primary and secondary sources, nationally and internationally, as appropriate.

B. Subject specific intellectual and research skills

Upon successful completion of the programme, students will be able to:

B1. interpret complex legal issues systematically, making sound judgements and communicating findings clearly and accurately in English using appropriate legal terminology.

B2. analyse practical legal and technological problems logically and provide a range of solutions to them informed by critical evaluation of their merits.

B3. analyse primary legal source materials such as cases and statutes and apply the law derived from this data to the solution of practical legal problems.

B4. critically evaluate and synthesise doctrinal arguments surrounding particular areas of law and technology and construct a coherent argument from relevant data.

B5. process a large quantity of complex data and apply that information to the resolution of individual problems.

C. General Transferable Skills, Professional Skills and Attributes

Upon successful completion of the programme, students will be able to:

C1. explain how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in law and technology, and apply these skills in order to make personal and reasoned judgements in the areas studied, especially in relation to the award-linked subject area.

C2. appraise relevant ethical and policy issues which underpin the areas of law and technology studied.

C3. listen effectively to others, with a view to extracting relevant information, identifying gaps in information and/or distilling key points in order to form a coherent critique.

C4. work independently and with originality in tackling and solving problems and overall act as an autonomous professional.

C5. communicate the conclusions of their research clearly and concisely to legal and non-legal; technical and non-technical audiences.

C6. identify transferable skills for employment requiring the exercise of personal responsibility, independent learning, and the exercise of initiative in complex and unpredictable situations.

C7. critically evaluate their own progress and independent learning for continuing professional development.

C8. appraise and make decisions with complex and unpredictable information and/or data.

C9. evaluate and apply concepts learned in one area to another.

Modules

Credits

Face to Face Teaching Contact Hours

Independent Study Hours

Total Contact Hours per module

Compulsory Modules

 

 

 

 

Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain in Law

30

20

280

300

Dissertation

60

11

589

600

Optional Modules (Select three)

 

 

 

 

International Trade Law

30

20

280

300

International Corporate Governance

30

20

280

300

Cyberlaws (The Laws of Data and Digital Assets)

30

20

280

300

The approach to learning and teaching on the Master of Laws programmes is predominantly learner-centered. Each taught module is divided into a number of Units which are presented using the Prepare, Engage, Consolidate approach.

Prepare: this represents all of the work the student needs to complete before attending/completing the relevant workshop. Traditional lecture content will be presented in short bite-sized segments of approximately 10 minutes to better engage the modern student. Guided independent research and reading will be expected as part of a student’s preparation.

Engage: this represents the interactive element of the Unit. This could be a face-to-face workshop, asynchronous online workshop, or an asynchronous online activity.

Consolidate: this represents the final part of the Unit and can be used by students to check their understanding of the Unit immediately after their Engage activity or as part of their revision for the module or both. Consolidate activities will vary depending on the module and Unit but could include Test and Feedback (computer-based questions).

Within each of the modules, the student will be expected to demonstrate an ability to complete a complex set of tasks and activities autonomously. 

Example learning methods:

  • Test and Feedback questions (providing immediate feedback to students on their understanding),
  • Directed and independent self-study, group or web-based discussions,
  • Consolidation media (combination of lecture style and question-based)
  • Case studies, problem-solving activities, research activities, guest speakers, and group-based research and presentations

a. Minimum Academic Entry Requirement:  

  • Students should possess a minimum 2nd class honors degree in any subject at 2:2 or above or equivalent.
  • There is a Compulsory Two Week Induction required for all students unless they can evidence the successful completion of either:
    • an LLB or equivalent; or
    • a minimum of 3 legal modules, worth at least 80 QCF credits that must include: English Legal System; Contract Law; and Law of Tort

b. Minimum English Language Entry Requirement:

  • An English language level equivalent to IELTS 6.5 or above, with a minimum of 6.0 in each component.

c. Minimum Age:

  • 18 years or above

Modules

Compulsory Modules Optional Modules

Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain in Law

International Trade Law
Dissertation International Corporate Governance
  Cyberlaws (The Laws of Data and Digital Assets)

information. The module will cover the need for regulating financial reporting (for example, the role of financial accounting standards such as UK and US Generally Accepted Accounting Practice (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) in regulating financial reporting). How financial statements and reports are prepared and how to interpret them. Sources of finance and their associated risks and returns (including debt and equity finance). Capital structure and the cost of capital and how to evaluate these for decision-making purposes. Financial decision making including evaluation and monitoring.

The second part of the module will focus on risk management and in particular, will cover risk frameworks; managing risk and compliance; and the impact of the business environment on organisational risk management.

governance, providing the context within which the subject operates.
Specifically, Unit 1 will provide an overview of the discipline and set the scope and limitations of the module within the field of international corporate governance.

This overview will also provide students with the areas of further study permitted for their dissertation under the LLM International Corporate Governance programme .

Unit 2 will provide students with the knowledge and understanding required to become successful researchers in the field of International Corporate Governance. Students will get a chance to practice and develop these skills during the course of the module in preparation for the independent research required for their award-linked dissertation.
Students will be encouraged to explore theoretical and reflective approaches to their research as this is the standard approach taken. Students will also be exposed to empirical research methods, although due to the time constraints of a one-year Master’s programme, this approach will not be encouraged for all students.

This module will consider the role of corporate governance in a global context allowing students to evaluate the models and theories of corporate governance. It will cover:

a. models of corporate governance with particular focus on:

  • outsider models (UK, US)
  • insider models (Japan, Germany)
  • hybrid models (France, China)

b. path dependence and convergence theories in relation to models of corporate governance

c. the main theories of corporate governance (agency, stakeholder, etc) to investigate the main actors in corporate governance (directors, shareholders, employees, creditors)

  • attempts at harmonisation of corporate governance codes
  • the appropriateness of regulation in corporate governance
  • the future of global corporate governance

research and analysis skills in an area linked to their award title. Students must formulate their own research questions under the supervision and submit a suitable proposal for consideration by the University’s Research Group. The research question must link to the award-linked titular module as outlined at the beginning of that module in negotiation with the appointed supervisor.
Each student will be allocated a supervisor in advance of drafting their proposal. The supervisor will guide the student through the proposal drafting process and will support the student through the proposal approval process.

Once approved, the student will complete their research under supervision and produce a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words. Students will be entitled to a minimum of seven hours of supervision. Students will be entitled to submit a chapter or selection of their work, up to a maximum of 3,000 words, for review by their supervisor. The supervisor will not grade the work but will provide feedback and suggest areas for improvement / further development.


As part of the dissertation module, students are required to complete a series of appropriate research workshops. These workshops will be organised at a University level. Relevant workshops will be identified at a programme level by the University’s Research Group and, if necessary, additional workshops may be identified by the student’s supervisor.

Students will also undertake research methods training in their chosen award specialisation as part of the award-linked module.

Specifically, Unit 1 will provide an overview of the discipline and set the scope and limitations of the module within the field of legal technology. This overview will also provide students with the areas of further study permitted for their dissertation under the MSc Legal Technology programme.

Unit 2 will provide students with the knowledge and understanding required to become successful researchers in the field of Legal Technology. Students will get a chance to practice and develop these skills during the course of the module in preparation for the independent research required for their award-linked dissertation.

Students will be encouraged to explore theoretical and reflective approaches to their research as this is the standard approach taken. Students will also be exposed to empirical research methods, via the University’s technology incubator (to be launched in 19/20).

This module will take a look at how disruptive technologies are bringing about a fundamental shift in decision-making and shaping a core way of how the modern legal practice operates.

To address the concerns of future lawyers, this module will look into the growing use of Artificial Intelligence platforms to facilitate the process of document analysis and contract review. This part of the course will consider the benefits of automation for both internal efficiency and productivity of the firm and managing client expectation and answer the question of whether the majority of lawyers will indeed become redundant due to advances in technology (due to time and cost-saving benefits of AI).

The growing popularity of Blockchain technology in Law shall also be explored. Students will be introduced to the concept of a distributed ledger as an immutable set of records with time-stamped signatures that could significantly reduce the number of disputes firms have to deal with. Students will look at the impact smart contracts have on the industry and assess their ability to push towards more standardization and create more efficiency in the legal industry.

look in-depth at EU privacy laws to ensure students have a solid grounding in GDPR terminology and principles (and related laws). The module will look at privacy laws both from the perspective of the organisation and the individual, and will then contrast the EU position with the divergent position in the US and other countries.

The module will then examine other key legal principles in cyberspace including the use of intellectual property laws to protect digital assets and the ability to enforce rights cross-border (jurisdiction). Students will also analyse the extent to which digital content is effectively regulated and the ongoing debate over the liability of intermediaries for this content. The course will conclude with a detailed consideration of the consequences for an organisation of a data breach and the challenges digital data presents for the legal services delivery.

The emphasis of this module will be on learning foundational legal concepts but then applying and critically evaluating these concepts within practical settings. This will include a critical review of cyber-insurance policies and the role of the Data Protection Officer within an organisation.

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